Impact of the International Students on the Greater Cincinnati Regional Economy

International-Students-CincinnatiThrough their tuition, living expenses, and consumption, International students support 2,940 jobs in the Greater Cincinnati Area and contribute 215 million to the local economy.

Boosting international student retention in GCA to 50 percent would create between 1,100 and 2,400 new jobs within six years, and increase Gross Product by $175 million to $350 million over the next 30 years.

While GCA has a healthy number of international students, in the long run the pipeline in the GCA colleges and universities is dependent on strong GCA employment opportunities. 37 percent of international students cited access to jobs or internships as their main reason for dissatisfaction with the postsecondary institution they were attending. When students are dissatisfied with their postsecondary experience, they often “say so” by transferring schools, and potentially moving out of GCA.

Sources of data

  1. Through their tuition, living expenses, and consumption, International students support 2,940 jobs in the GCA and contribute 215 million to the local economy

Source: http://www.nafsa.org/Explore_International_Education/Impact/Data_And_Statistics/The_International_Student_Economic_Value_Tool/ . See Ohio data (from the dropdown, select Maps to see by congressional district). The numbers are based on the 7600 International students in GCA.

Kentucky file http://www.nafsa.org/_/File/_/eis2014/Kentucky.pdf

Ohio file: http://www.nafsa.org/_/File/_/eis2014/Ohio.pdf

  1. Boosting international student retention in GCA to 50 percent would create between 1,100 and 2,400 new jobs within six years, and increase Gross Product by $175 million to $350 million over the next 30 years.

Sources: Brookings institute , “The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations”, 2014. http://www.brookings.edu/research/interactives/2014/geography-of-foreign-students#/M10420

Ohio GREAT methodology developed with Partnership for a New American Economy, November 2014;

Rita Ray, “Effect of Education on Gross Domestic Product: A Case Study from US ‘Mid-West’,” International Review of Business Research Papers or http://www.irbrp.com/static/documents/March/2014/1.%20Rita.pdf

  1. While GCA has a healthy number of international students, in the long run the pipeline in the GCA colleges and universities is dependent on strong GCA employment opportunities. 37 percent of international students cited access to jobs or internships as their main reason for dissatisfaction with the postsecondary institution they were attending. When students are dissatisfied with their postsecondary experience, they often “say so” by transferring schools, and potentially moving out of GCA.

Source: World Education Services conducted the 2013 survey. http://www.nafsa.org/Find_Resources/Publications/Periodicals/International_Educator/Retaining_International_Students/

 

Main source of data is the NAFSA Analysis and Methodology

  1. International student enrollment data is provided byOpen Doors produced by the Institute of International Education in partnership with the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
  2. Tuition and living expense data, which is used to calculate the total amount of economic benefit, comes from theS. Department of Education’s National Center of Educational Statistics Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).
  3. Total economic benefit and accompanying jobs analysis is derived using formulas developed for NAFSA: Association of International Educators by Jason Baumgartner, Director of Information Resources,Office of International Services, Indiana University – Bloomington.
  4. For a more detailed discussion, see“The Economic Benefits of International Student Enrollment to the U.S. Economy” (PDF 395KB).